Focus of the month

Every beginning of the month we examine one aspect of the big theme "improv", to insprire both instructors and participants.

JANUARY

Be daring!

 written by Björn Harras 

A lot of stuff can be done on an improv stage. If it`s a flight through outer space or a creepy family scene in the basement, your imagination has no limits. However, this is often easier said than done.
Many scenes take place in the ordinary world. Husband, wife and lover or father, mother and children are ingredients for scenes that everybody knows. Add the fact that someone loves somebody else and this person loves even another one and you have a standard scene. So far, so boring.

So how can we stretch the limits of our imagination? How can we achieve to improvise more interesting scenes? How can we go beyond?

We simply have to be daring. Dare to leave our own limited world and jump right into adventure. Dare to make an offer that at first sight doesn`t seem to fit the scene.

Standard-scene of a couple? Tell him that you have made an exciting discovery and then both fly to South America to have an adventure in the jungle, looking for a hidden treasure.

Because it`s change, that drives each scene. If nothing changes, the scene stays as it is and will sooner or later run into a dead end. Try to think out of the box and try not to censure yourself. Everybody knows this inner voice: »I don`t know, if I could do this now...« - YES, YOU CAN!

In the sacred (and secure) space of our improv school you are allowed to try out everything: be furious, be vulnerable, be an astronaut or a pirate, be tiny or be a licked pen in the coat of Santa Claus. Just be daring - nothing can happen to you!

Björn is going to teach with Inbal Lori both courses of »Improvisation for Stage and Film«
March 6th to May 29th
June 1st to 3rd
 

2017

DECEMBER

Fun with Tragedy

 written by Lee White 

 
Many teachers try to steer beginner students away from tragedy. »Stay positive. Look for positive endings.«, they always say. Even I tell students tragic stories are a tricky road not to be traveled lightly. We need tragic moments in our improv stories. All that positivity can get to be a little much. A good show should have a balance and range of emotions. Sadness and tragedy should be in the mix.  
So let’s talk tragedy. 
It’s a word that encompasses a lot. In the world of story telling there’s many different approaches to it. In improv shows I find it often gets done with little care or imagination. 
Some improvisers think that going for a negative or sad ending will be funny. The two characters getting a divorce at the end of the story or one killing the other doesn’t automatically make it a tragedy, or a comedy for that matter. Characters who suddenly become jerks or do something that seems so out of character just to get a reaction or aim towards some tragic ending doesn’t complete it either. Having a sad ending doesn’t make it a good tragedy.
There are random chaotic things that happen in life. No sense or purpose. Some like to show this in scenes. I feel that people know that. We live with it everyday. So why show that? If we show that life is senselessly cruel, we need to show that people can survive such things and life can go on. It can work and it can be fine to just end on a tragic note but consider why you make a choice to tell a story that ends with »bad things happen in life« as a final thought. Ending at the tragic moment leaves the audience with little hope and a frightened walk to the car.  
For me as a viewer, there’s one element I like to have to really feel good at the end of a tragic moment/story. (Yes. I like to feel good after a tragedy. My Mom always said while crying after a sad show »There’s nothing like a good cry.«)
A good tragedy should teach us something. The audience must see where the protagonist who suffers made the mistake. Show what went wrong. Then we can see the lesson that will hopefully teach us something about the way we are, the shared existence on this planet. It should leave the audience with guidance to not make the same mistakes the characters made. Maybe they will reflect on their past and change their future. 
To me the idea that the audience should learn from all stories we create is important but not always the case. In tragedies I think it’s crucial the audience walks away with something. If not hope in life, then a lesson or thought to give new perspectives. 
What we learn from characters in stories guide our everyday lives. A great tragedy can change the audiences future.
 
Lee White is an improv player from Canada, but he now is a Berlin resident for quiete a while. As one half of the legendary improv duo CRUMBS he has been invited to the annual improv festival IMPRO for many years. Lee is going to teach the Taster Weekend on December 2nd+3rd as well as the Evening Class for Beginners/Advansters from March 7th to April 4th.
NOVEMBER

Dear reader, in two days I have to submit the focus for November and - oh dear - I have nothing yet, not even an idea what to write about, and I actually have no time at all, I play daytime and evening shows, I have rehearsals, I teach workshops...
I had known my duty long ahead and, as it is, kept on postponing it. Now I’m in a fine mess: I`m completely overstrained. OK, what about these improv-tools? Accept what is happening. Say YES to the moment. Wasn`t that it? So: what is happening? I am overstrained. I told that to Ramona, guardian of the „focus of the month“. And her answer was: „Then write something imperfect, write about being overstrained.“ I guess she was right, so here it is, my focus of the month
:

Being overstrained 

 written by Konstanze Kromer 

 
I often preach these two principles:
1. Make it public that you feel overstrained
2. Use this state as an offer
So often we are afraid that we are in a scene and don`t know how to go on. Being blocked, not understanding what is happening, having no idea at all – oh my god!
„So – make it public“, I say. Just say „Stop!“, turn to the audience and ask them. „Who is this guy – my father or my teacher? I really don`t know.“ The audience will know, and they will love you for your candidness.
We just had this situation in a show: the whole story got more and more weird and complicated, we didn`t understand it any more and couldn`t explain this within the scene. So we made it public. We involved the audience, asked them, and within a moment everything was clear, we were relaxed and could continue to improvise with new energy. Thank you, audience! It is so relieving to know that you can always do this when in need. There is nothing you have to hide, endure or push through. If necessary: make it public. As I just did: Help! I am overstrained with writing the focus of the month!

The second insight is: everything is an offer! If you find yourself all tense on stage, sweating and panting from the fear of having no idea – use it for your character. You might be a low-status who has his first date in ten years and doesn`t fit into his pants any more. Or a medieval woman, accused for being a witch, who is waiting for the torturer to come and not knowing what is going to happen. Whatever!

So, being overstrained might be a gift. By making it public to Ramona, I finally found my subject for the focus. And, hey, I actually dared to submit a short, imperfect text. So, thank you, Ramona!

One last advice at the end: When in class, don`t wait until you HAVE to go on stage. Like I did with my task of writing the focus. Better jump into the scene, even if you think that you have no idea. You will save yourself from all this before-stress. And afterwards you will feel great. Jump, and the net will appear!

Konstanze will teach with charme, clarity and a wise view the Tuesday Evening Beginners Class, starting in January.
OCTOBER

No rules!

written by Inbal Lori

Here’s something that you might have heard before, but is always good to remember: In impro there are no rules.
I mean, come on - would we be doing this if we needed anymore rules in our lives? Don’t we already have enough?
I think we are improvising (at least some of us) because of the freedom, joy, creativity and playfulness. Not because we are technocrats wishing to obey rules, right?
So what about »say yes«, »don’t talk about what you do«, »don’t ask questions?«, »have a platform«, »avoid teaching scenes« and so on??? Sure - these are wonderful tools, but are they rules??? Could we not play a great scene which happens to be a teaching scene? Could we not talk about what we do and have a super funny interaction? Can we not »block« and actually bring the scene to a better place?
And Of course, I’m teaching all those themes I mentioned here and many more - but I don’t teach them as rules that cannot be broken, I rather think about them as tools and techniques.
Fair questions at this point will be - so if we have no rules - how do we begin? Where do we go? What do we follow? How do we know when to do what?
And my answer is: As a beginner use these tools as much as you can, explore them, play with the possibilities they offer. Than, the more advanced you get, this tools will become your second nature, which means you will have more confidence in knowing when to use what. And sometimes you might find that the scene would actually work better if you don’t follow them in this particular case.
You will have the freedom of using them when they are needed and not using them when they are not.
Instead of trying to blindly follow the rules put your focus on what gives you - and more importantly your partner, and not less importantly, the audience - pleasure. And if that means doing things totally different from what you were taught - than go for it!
But remember: it has to be enjoyable for your partner and the audience. After all, it is all about doing the best show you can.
So I will wrap it up by quoting something that I heard the marvelous Patti Stiles say last year in Canberra:
»In impro we have no rules, just tools. The only thing closer to a rule is an ethical code: make your partner look good«.
I loved that sentence, because it reminds us of the most important thing - I guess: we are doing this together. Impro is something that is happening between us, so really listen and notice your partner. They are your biggest resource and inspiration. Follow the pleasure and use or »unuse« the tools as needed!
Enjoy!!!

 

SEPTEMBER

Improv and therapy

written by Regina

Improv provokes change. If you improvise, you deal with action, for this is what the stage needs. Inevitably, an action will change the present situation. At best, every action of my partner causes a change in my behaviour and vice versa – it`s like a game of ping-pong, which can bring about the most unusual behaviour patterns.
As a systemic therapist, my goal is to give people the opportunity to broaden their options for perception and action. In improv we try to find connections and relationships between everything we have. Thus it was a natural step to combine improv and therapy in my work.
But how can you link them and where are the connections?
The more I studied systemic therapy, the more links did I find. I am convinced that my long experience with improv effects my attitude as a therapist. Many aspects of improv seem important to me in this context: accepting the ideas of my partner, perceiving the first impulse in myself or in my partner, putting the focus on the interaction between me and my partner, trusting what is developing at the moment, reacting flexibly to each new development and letting the unusual happen.
When working in a youth psychiatry and in a psychiatric ambulance, I was able to use the potential of improv exercises. One highlight for me was doing status exercises with adolescents. To see, how some were able to surprise themselves, how they were suddenly acting completely other than usual and how this was perceived by the others. Suddenly it was possible to look directly into someones eyes and to dominate in a conversation. What a precious moment, when this young person suddenly realizes: Ah, this I can do as well!
How can you transfer the experience from a situation of play to real life? How can this be attended in a responsible way? Which exercises are the most useful for which situation or which problem? These are the questions in my work, and  I try to find answers and  explore different possibilities. Luckily I don`t have to search alone, for another one from the Gorillas is working and experimenting with the links between improv and therapy: Barbara, in her work as a music therapist. When we had our first symposium this spring, we were able to have a great exchange with many interested therapists. And in fall we will have a network meeting.
Others use methods from improv theatre in therapeutic context as well, such as the colleagues from Second City in Chicago, who offer improv workshops for people with social fears, in cooperation with a local health centre.
So, in order to throw the rock far enough: when will we have the first international exchange about improv and therapy?

Regina offers (together with Barbara) a workshop for interested therapists on October 14/15, giving an insight into the world of improvisation. Playful,  practical and with time for reflection, different  improv exercises will be explored concerning their therapeutic use. The two of them are qualified for this, since they are not only Gorillas but also therapists and both love the potential connections.

 

AUGUST

Pressure

written by Karin Werner

»Exert pressure«, »be under pressure« - these terms bring about negative associations. Yet there are situations in improv, when a soft or challenging pressure may help to get me deeper into a certain situation or to leave my comfort zone.
It's great to put a character on stage, which the audience loves and laughs about. And yes, it is fun to indulge in this laughter and put another coal on the fire. Then all of a sudden this character may get into a more serious situation. It is my choice now as an actor to either release the upbuilding tension with a joke and give the audience more laughter - or to be vulnerable and accept this emotional situation. This moment is a gift. I usually quickly and unconsciously decide to accept this gift or not. If fear lets me stay in my comfort zone, it is good to have a partner onstage, who - with gentle pressure - insists on having my character stay with the (uncomfortable) situation; it's good to have a sidecoaching director, who forces me to accept the (uncomfortable) emotion. And if I am able to trust my partner or my director (or both) and open up, the show may gain a nice extra colour.
And when you watch your partner and think »Come on, stay with this now!«, it is great to really try keeping him there and bringing him forward.
Same in teaching: what a joy it is to see a student overcome his fears and make a step forward. This doesn't always work and so I want to be there and encourage him to try again and again. Just as I do.

In Autumn Karin teaches with Urban the Beginner Class from September 4th to October 22nd. In Potsdam she teaches the Beginner+Advanced Class from September 27th to November 29th.

JULY

Emptiness (...)

written by Leon Düvel

Sometimes, sitting at the bar after a show, someone asks me: »Aren't you ever afraid to have no idea? Did you ever have a blackout?« Yes, I did have a blackout once. And yes, I used to be afraid of having no idea, afraid of this emptiness (...) Luckily not any more, for I know: emptiness gives room. Room for your partner, room for the imagination of the audience, room for your own feelings. So: don't be afraid of the emptiness.

Actually, there is more danger of talking a lot and saying nothing. Making new offers too quickly, instead of staying with what you have and pushing it forward. Not going into detail and moving forward too fast. In these cases, a moment of silence, a bit of emptiness would do good. A brief rest to reflect on what has been said and played.

However, this emptiness shouldn't be used to let go of the scene and the situation. It is not a rest for the improvisor. You should stay with your emotion and your energy. Then the next step, the next idea will follow automatically. It's really all a matter of energy. If you keep it up, the tension of the scene will stay. So will the emotion. Or a new one comes up. Emptiness should never make an improvisation stop (...) In that case you should fill it up.

Actually, emptiness is a beautiful thing. Something we should look for, something almost sacred. For it is hard to find. It's quite impossible to really do nothing. An empty stage can be an important moment in a show. It creates a special atmosphere, filled with thoughts and images, all waiting to be worked on.

Sitting at the bar, if I am honest, I can still sense this little fear of having a blackout (...) But that's not bad, it can even be good for the stage energy. It can help to keep up the tension in an improvisation, like walking a tightrope. But don't be afraid of »not knowing«, for hopefully this will lead to a mistake, and as you know: »mistakes should be friends«. See Focus May 2016. (Personally, I am more afraid of an electric power breakdown, concerning this I can remommend the book »Blackout« by Marc Elsberg).

Leaving the bar after my third non-alcoholic beer (improvisors don't need drugs), I sometimes say to the guy who had asked me: »I would be more afraid of forgetting my lines in a scripted play«. The guy, who is drunk by now (he is not an improvisor), then usually replies: »I guess, then you would have to improvise, huh?« (...) And then I have no idea of what to say next. Good night.

Leon is teaching the stage level starting in September. And the Impro4ever class with the »hero`s journey«, starting in November. Guaranteed without drugs.

 

JUNE

The little difference

written by Billa Christe 

Having wandered through the theatre scene of Berlin in the past years, I found out, that a lot of directors work with improvisation as a tool. Actors are told to improvise a certain sequence and don`t they dare play it the same way next night. Armin Petras, for a long time superintendant of the Maxim Gorki Theatre, with numerous works as a director, does this. I was sitting in the audience and thought: why is this so authentic? Because it was improvised. So I thought: why don`t we do it the other way around and improvise more as if it were directed. That`s how „Theatre. Improvised“ came to life, now known as »#NEU«.
Improv theatre lives from being in the moment, actors and actresses take risks, don`t know what they are doing? I believe in all those years - 20 years as you know - that improv theatre can do more than just play scenes that start with an audience's suggestion. I enjoy seeing actors on stage, who know exactly what they are doing or pretend that they know. Who engage with the partner, but the partner also sees what you want to play. I give my partner the focus to let him have a three-minute-monologue, as if it were written, no fidgeting, very secure and authentic, for he knows where he is aiming at.
Having learned so many rules throughout the years („give focus to each other, everything is there that you need, let your partner look good, go into action, find out, what your relationship is about) we are quite qualified to really play theatre. Come on stage, knowing where you come from and go off stage, knowing where you go to, this is a basic rule of acting.
I am in favor of doing this more, to teach this and to improvise like this. I`m not always successful in doing so, I catch myself flirting with the audience, but so what, I keep on trying, the journey is the reward.
Isn`t it the biggest compliment, when the audience cannot believe that the scene they watched was completely improvised? This adds the little extra to it all. And it is a great joy to let stories and emotions come up, because you know them, you have lived through them.
It`s time to bring it on stage. Improv can do more. More theatre.

This subject will be taught by Billa on a weekend course on June 17th+18th. And since this workshop was booked out quickly, she will do it again: on September 2nd+3rd.

MAY

Surprise

written by Christoph Jungmann 

I believe it was in fall of 1985. I took part in a workshop at the transform theatre (you know that something is long passed, if  you have difficulties finding it on google). The workshop was led by a Polish director, an elderly, soft and almost wise man. After I had played a scene, he said, in his characteristic accent: „You know, theatre iiis mostly one thing: surpraaiize.“ This sentence has definitely stayed with me like no other. When I have spent an evening in the theatre or at the movies and wondered why I disliked it so much  or why I couldn`t be enthusiastic, although there was nothing bad about it, I always come to one conclusion: Because it did not surprise me. Likewise, even if an evening wasn`t so great on the whole, it may still stick with me, if there was a  surpraaiize.
Naturally, in improvisational theatre, due to its nature, the moment of surprise is more vital than in other theatre forms – you never know what is going to happen. But is that really true? For after all, even our beloved world of improv can be infiltrated with the expectable. To see capriciousness at the improvised job center or to see a priest going after a boy or to see a Russian drink a lot of vodka – oh well, all of this looks very familiar to me. Even if I don`t know the dialogue yet, I see how the wind blows, whether I am part of the scene or watching it. Now here comes the tricky part: where and when are we negating what Johnstone called „the obvious“ and where are we getting „original“? Hard to say, actually. I don`t think there is a rule for it, it is a matter of the moment, of the stage magic and of the actors intuition. So follow your impulse, but if you`re not sure: go for the things that you wouldn`t usually do, don`t play a ticket inspector or a homeless person in a subway scene, rather be a nice and attractive mother-in-law. Surprise them all: the audience, your partners on stage, and yourself.

Christoph  is teaching during our Summer Academy on Schloss Trebnitz and in his domino-class he helps you to find surprising characters and monologues (August 31st to September 3rd).

APRIL

Space

written by Norbert Riechmann 

»Space« is a word that you often hear in an improv class. Usually it refers to the space of the scene, a location that we first have to establish with our imagination. But there is also the space that we take and claim for ourselves. And the space that we give to our partner. And the space that we give to certain elements or thoughts; you could say that in this case »space« is a synonym for »time«.
As we are entering the »music room«, there are also spaces. Musicologists speak of a »diastematic space«, which means the space between the lowest and highest note in a melody. If this space is large, the melody can make large movements and is often hard to sing. Is the space small, it may get monotoneous quickly.
So what has all this to do with improv, with my spontaneity?
When it gets to music in improv and we not only think about »singing«, the term »space« (which can be used in various ways) may help us to improvise differently, richer, better. We can discover spaces, give space, take space. Next to the concrete dialogue and movement in a scene, you may take notice of other existing spaces, that can help to open up, relieve, enrich, even give joy. If we are open for this, we might notice that sometimes we don't have to talk at all, because music can transport our emotions much better than words. In Romantic Comedies you can often see this work. Or we let music give subtext to our scene. Then a simple, happy scene may suddenly become threatful or even scary (as in the famous movie »Jaws«). Or we let us guide by music in an abstract way, work with the temperament or the movement that the music offers.
There are many more ways to deal with the term »space«, see above. If we dare to enter and explore all of these spaces, our work on stage can be richer on different levels, more interesting. And in the end we will have more fun. Isn't this a nice goal?

Norbert is teaching the Tuesday Evening Advanced Class May 23rd to July 18th with »music« as the central subject. The class deals with singing, listening, using music to support characters, and – yes, of course - with space.

MARCH

The Sandwich Theory

written by Jacob Banigan 

Let’s consider an impro show to be a sandwich.
Picture any sandwich you like. Food is layered between bread on a plate in front of you. OK? That’s the show. You have manipulated your life, your time and money with a plan to consume this experience. But before you eat it, let’s look at what it’s made of.

The Layers of an impro show sandwich:

The format of the show is the bread.
Defines its shape and structure and holds it all together. Supports the content. It is the reliable, dry layer that allows us to enjoy the contents without getting all messy. It is how we recognize the sandwich/show from afar. We see it or hear about it and say “I can grasp that.” It is the promise “Consuming this will be satisfying”.

The fiction is the meat, or protein.
The shared imagination of everyone in the room, the dream we are all buying in to. The content. The situations of the scenes, the characters and their world.
This is the nourishment, it’s what we consume it for. The satisfying heart of the experience. It has substance.
Usually this is the first thing we ask about a sandwich, “What’s in it?”. But alas, we cannot know until we experience it together. We hope the filling will be filling. But it’s a mystery sandwich, before we decide what to put in the middle.

The story is the roughage: salad, lettuce, sprouts, etc.
The fibrous material which aids the digestion of the substance.
The story lays across the fiction and allows us to follow cause and effect, so that we get something from the content. We need stories, in order to process what happens in our collective dream.
Without this fibre, we would consume the product without getting all the healthful benefits.

The games are the extra toppings: tomatoes, onions, etc.
The challenges from objective games, the agreements that arise from the subjective “game of the scene”, or the patterns that we discover and uphold. They each have distinct structures that give extra surprises of flavor, when you notice them.

And although each layer is tasty in it’s own way, you can’t separate them and consume them one by one, like a weirdo. They really must all be experienced together in each bite…That’s how we do it. Moment to moment, Bite for bite.

The metaphor can be stretched to include many aspects...

The theater is the table. The stage is the plate. We’d like them to be clean and presentable when our meal is served. The mess we leave after it’s over serves as a reminder of what wonderful things were within.

The lighting is the sauce. Warming mustard. Cooling ketchup.

Music is bacon. So good.

Sometimes we like it cheesey. We know it’s not totally healthy, but you only live once, right?

Peppered with jokes. Salted with tears.

A schmear of schmaltz is sometimes welcome.

A glass of wine on the side is always welcome.

And every sandwich/show experience is enhanced by the context around it’s consumption. Who was I with? Where were we? What was happening in my neighbourhood, the city, the world? What circumstances lead me to this point? That sandwich changed my life... I really needed it.
And you cannot explain the experience adequately. Have you ever tried to describe a sandwich, and felt that the listener really appreciated what it meant to you? You had to be there.

We have to make sure that we serve fresh product, not processed. We should be proud of each ingredient, and hopefully know where each one came from. People should leave the table satisfied with that particular sandwich, and perhaps imagining new recipes for next time.

Jacob Banigan belongs to the top performers of international improv theater. He is playing improv for 27 years and has had great share in the development of this artistic form. He has been the artistic director of the Rapid Fire Theatre in Canada, and for considerable time has been a member of the “Theater im Bahnhof” in Graz, the “English Lovers” in Vienna and part of the “Rocket Sugar Factory”. With the latter he will be seen on May25 at the Ratibor. And from May 25-28 he is leading the wonderful workshop “Ignore me!”

FEBRUARY

Going Into Detail

written by Michael Wolf 

Go on stage, get breakfast ready: open the bread box, take out the bread, it`s not ready sliced, so you have to cut a slice.

Talk with your son about his education.

Put butter on your bread, the butter is not there yet, take it out of the fridge, it`s still a little bit hard, but you can do it. Spread the butter evenly on your bread, you have to be careful, because the hard butter can make the bread tear.

Explain to your son, that the years as an apprentice are tough years, the years that run to fat are yet to come.

Open the fridge again, take out the jar with jam, close the fridge, open the jam with strength, take off a bit of mold from the top, notice that you are not allowed to put the butter knife into the jam, take a plastic spoon from the drawer. Use it to put jam on your bread, not without closing the drawer before.

Tell your son that the sweet life will soon begin for him as well.

Why do I write all this? To show you that you have to go on stage and DO things. Don`t become comfortable, go into detail.
And then talk about other things, not about your action. But from your action you will get time, inspiration, and a meta-level.

Michael teaches the Taster Weekend on March 4th+5th as well as the Advanced Eveningclass on Tuesdays from March 14th to May 9th.

JANUARY

Beginnings

written by Robert Munzinger 

Actually, it doesn`t matter at all how you start an improvised scene. Literally e v e r y t h i n g is right. To yell for help, to run into the audience, to sing the aria of the queen of the night, to slice up a cucumber, to strip, to chip, to whip, to peel, to kneel, to steal – whatever! Everything is right. As soon as something is there or isn`t there, you can start to add, to copy, to bring forward, to establish something completely new - whatever seems the right answer to the question of the beginning, if I may put it like that.

Actually, it doesn`t matter at all how you start an improvised scene. Literally e v e r y t h i n g is right. To yell for help, to run into the audience, to sing the aria of the queen of the night, to slice up a cucumber, to strip, to chip, to whip, to peel, to kneel, to steal – whatever! Everything is right. As soon as something is there or isn`t there, you can start to add, to copy, to bring forward, to establish something completely new - whatever seems the right answer to the question of the beginning, if I may put it like that.

So, when you begin improvising, one of the first steps is to really understand the principle that everything is possible to begin a scene with. This is due to another principle called „Say YES!“ If you know, that your partner will really accept and say YES to everything that you offer as a beginning, the spell of insecurity and doubt is already broken. Knowing about these two principles (everything is right and say yes) should make it possible for you to trust yourself and follow your first impuls.

And yet: although it doen`t matter what to start with, I usually advise my students to start by establishing the space, for example by beginning with an action. Or to find an attitude that you have towards the space you are in and/or the action that you are doing. If you decide on WHERE you are and HOW you feel, the imagination will easily open up and let other characters appear. Of course, this way of beginning is no set rule (only rule in improv: no rules), but it certainly doesn`t do any harm and in case you really feel uninspired, the best thing you can do is to establish a space and develop an inner attitude towards it and then the inspiration will come all by itself.

OK, now I will slowly begin with the ending...

But Robert will start right away again in January with teaching the „Games, Games, Games“ class. And in March on three weekends with „The Format“. All classes are on the „Impro4ever“ level.
We wish all of you a Happy New Year! 

 

2016

DECEMBER

Year`s End: Terminated, Finished, Over and Out

written by Regina Fabian

The title holds a promise: something isn't brought further, coming to an end. This text is finished after 365 words.
Endings in improv appear fast, they like to surprise with a twist. Finding the end in improv seems to be easy, because a new scene directly starts, a new story is on its way. The lightness of improv lets you find the courage to try out something, that doesn't need to be continued into eternity. This lightness sometimes touches arbitrary action: „Who cares, this will be over in a moment and something else comes up.“ The ending then comes as a relieve.
We have tried out different ways to end a scene: fluent transitions with a change of body posture, indicating a new beginning; a hardly noticed ending. Sometimes not even by your partner, who is still playing the preceding scene. Or the end, set by the musician or light technician; I remember our improvised Fassbinder.
Finding the right end of a scene together: When it works, it feels good. Nobody says a word, that needn't to be said, for all sense that the story is finished, each further sentence is one too many.
When we started with improv - back in the last millenium – we often set a clear end: „And black!“ An unmistakable stop, to prevent a displaced ending, missing the moment, when the story is told and all loose ends have come together. For after this, new ends develop, which are also bearing new beginnings.
Other endings may feel unsatisfying, because we all know, there was more to be told, something is still missing.
Finding the courage for the end. Truly ending something, when there is nothing more to improvise. All being said, each further word is taking away the value of what was said.

„And everything ends, and no storm is coming up“, Rio Reiser sang in „Junimond“.

Is it possible for something to completely end, not to be continued somehow? Don't ideas, characters, atmospheres of a completed scene appear again later in the evening, somehow, somewhere?

When is something really at an end?

What stays?

Be ready for farewell and for restart (Spuren, Hermann Hesse)

In memory of Saskia.

Regina is offering glogg at the Winter Open Stage on Dec11 and will drink up the leftovers all alone. So help her!
She will also be teaching the Monday morning class starting
on January 9 and will also be part of our brand new summer academy on Trebnitz Castle in August. But that will all happen next year. Until then, we Gorillas wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

NOVEMBER

Improv and science

written by Dominik Klarhölter, who, together with Lisa Rasehorn, is making a scientific study at the University of Leipzig/Dresden on the psychological effects of improvisation 

Are we getting smarter, prettier, happier with improv? »Yes, definitely«, someone might say, who plays improv himself. But is it really true, from a scientific point of view? Classical music supposedly makes kids smarter, rain prettier and money happier. So why shouldn`t improv somehow do all of it? After all, each improv show is like a fabulous brain-jogging, a wild roller coaster ride of emotions and an everlasting source of creativity and fun.
Since we didn`t want this to stay part of the »felt knowledge«, we decided a year ago to make a scientific psychological study on improv. Not much has yet been done or published on this matter. This fueled us to make this study, as we did our own experiences as improvisors, where we see many aspects, that are worth to be more closely examined – as the whole section »Focus Of The Month« is showing. So we asked ourselves: Does playing improv really make you more attentive, more stress-resistant, more self-secure and self-effective, all of which are a base for higher satisfaction in life and for a healthy psyche.
Before we will be able to give answers to the questions of our study in a few weeks, here is an attempt to deal with the initial questions from above: Does improv make smarter? This actually will be a question for other kinds of studies, for a lot of IQ-tests would have to be done. Another way to ask: Could it be that smart people choose improv as their »playground«, because it challenges them in different ways? And what about pretty, does improv make prettier? Well, taking the detour of smile wrinkles and the corresponding positive emotions, I am sure it does. Remarkable, and indeed something we found in our study, is that after an improv-class of several weeks, the improv students really did show a higher degree of self-effectiveness – a basic and learned trait, enabling you to take your life into your own hands and to feel ready to master even difficult future situations. In this regard it is well possible that self-effective people say: I stop disliking my large ears, from now on I will like them, period. Almost as if I would prescribe myself self-acceptance and self-love. Sounds strange, but it does more likely work with people who have a higher expectation of self-effectiveness. Because they expect that they themselves can be effective. Thus they can more successfully manage all kinds of challenges, no matter if they come from the outer world or if they are self-assigned (like: stop smoking, learn 10-finger-typing or a new tense in a foreign language). And as a side-effect, this increased self-effectiveness makes more resistant towards fears, depressions or higher stress levels. To put it short: In this sense playing improv really does increase your psychic health and even your degree of happiness, for unhappy people rather are convinced that they can change little or nothing in their live.
So, whereas modern science proves that classical music (unfortunately) does not make you smarter, rain (unfortunately) does not make you prettier, and lots of money (fortunately) does not really make you happy, playing improv might indeed be something real. And we expect even more than we and others have yet been able to scientifically undermine, for our scientific possibilities and methods had been limited.
So, research on and with improv will continue, and until then it means:  Go up on stage, not knowing what will happen, thinking yes, acting and trusting and following impulses, being present and ready to fail with a smile, so that we may all get even more smart, more pretty, more happy – or enjoy just to stay the way we are.

Dominik Klarhölter and Lisa Rasehorn are improv-passionate students of psychology in Leipzig. They are writing their master thesis on the effects of improv theater on  psychic health. Some of the students of our improv school have participated in the study. Among them we will draw 3 coupons worth 50 EUR for the improv-school at the Winter Open Stage on Dec 11th. Dominik will also be there and tell us more about the results of their study. For all of you who have yet missed it, but are still interested, here is a link to the test: Improv study
That you may get even prettier and your self-effectiveness may further rise!

OCTOBER

On maturity

written by Thomas

„Und kam die goldene Herbsteszeit,
und die Birnen leuchteten weit und breit...“
(„And when autumn came round, the golden tide,
And pears were glowing far and wide...“)

Most Germans know these lines, which come from a famous poem of Theodor Fontane about the Squire von Ribbeck auf Ribbeck in Havelland, who gave his juicy pears to the children of the village. And doesn`t everyone cherish a fully ripened apple, pear or plum, picked at its peak from the tree? That`s what I call perfection. And what did it need for that? Enough sun, enough rain, good soil, no pests, and simply enough time to ripen. Mostly things, that we have only limited influence on. Sure, the apple farmer can grow high efficient cultures and use a lot of fertilizers and pesticides in order to ensure a good harvest. But first of all there are still better and worse years and secondly, an apple from the supermarket just doesn`t have the taste of a ripe apple picked from an old tree. After all, the supermarket apples are picked before they are fully ripe, so that storage is easier.
So, where is the connection to improvisation?
When you begin with improv, you learn to be spontaneous, to follow your impulse. That`s  a lot of fun and after a bit of training there often is high speed and energy onstage, people go for the quick laugh and in the end everyone says „wow, that was great!“
But concerning content and story, these improv shows often lack a lot. They feel to me a bit like those supermarket apples: they look good but all the same and actually they are not really that yummy.
If you want to improvise stories that are remembered by the audience (and by yourself), you need time. Most of all, the improvisor needs time to develop. Almost everyone makes the experience that after the first thrill, improvising suddenly may become hard work. At first you only hear „say YES“, but suddenly you have a bunch of „rules“ on your mind: How does a story work? Where is the turning point for my character? How do I play a character in the first place, instead of just being myself? Oh, and then „less talking, more physical acting“, „don`t forget to create and honor the space you`re in“, „remember status“, and so on.
At this point it only helps to relax and stay calm. Don`t try to do everything at once, put your focus one time on this subject, one time on the other, and appreciate every progress that you make, every scene that worked a bit better for you, that felt a bit more „ripe“. The young apple tree also can`t bring forward a whole bunch of perfect apples, even if it had permanent water, sun and fertilizers. It takes a few years for him to be big and strong enough. We Gorillas are improvising for almost 20 years now and we still feel that we can learn a lot.
What applies to the maturity of an improvisor, also applies to a scene or story. A good story is like a ripe apple. As this one has the perfect balance of sweetness and tartness, so does the story need a good balance of funny and serious, it needs interesting characters and an interesting subject. And all  of this cannot be genetically engineered and forced to be in always the same high quality. Actually it is about detecting the story, attending it, with all the improv skills that we momentarily have (also see the July focus on „Leadership“ about this).  And then finding the right end (picking the ripe apple), which for many improvisors is really hard to achieve. But don`t worry, the sense of finding the right end can also ripen...
So stay with improv (and with our courses), take what you need to mature as an improvisor, stay calm (with yourself and your partners on stage), pick yourself a ripe apple and enjoy the golden days of autumn.
(By the way, on www.mundraub.org, you can find public fruit trees, to pick ripe fruits from for free.)

 

Thomas Chemnitz is teaching with the Morning Class Beginners with Leon from Oct. 31st to Dec. 19th.

SEPTEMBER

Is there a life after vacation?

written by Barbara

Summertime is a time to travel for many of us. It`s fun and feels good to encounter foreign places and get into the unknown. We are in this special travel mood, open for a bit of adventure and ready to accept things that are new and strange to us.
But now? Vacation is over, so back into the dull everyday-life? Let those bad-mooded colleagues spoil your own mood? Will this good vacation mood go away faster than your suntan? Or can you preserve it?
To encounter new and unknown things and learn how to deal with them is a topic that we always have in life. Sure, in your vacation you do it voluntarily and feel more ready for this kind of challenge. After all, we are only there for a limited time, we don`t REALLY have to adjust and to change. But otherwise?
In our workshops we teach you to say YES to the offers that you encounter on the improv stage, and those can also be strange, unknown, uncomfortable.
If you bring the idea of improv further, it can sneak into your life. Here you can also learn to encounter a new person, a new idea, a new topic without prejudice.
Rejection is not in the sense of improv and resistance is „rejection of a change process due to fear of side-effects“, as Berekat Karavul puts it in his „Handbook Project Management“.
If you start to deal with those feared side-effects, it can really get interesting to see, what is coming up, if you put some thought to it in a quiet hour and try to write down, what it really is that you are afraid of.
So what can I do to change the situation, if I really don`t like it the way it is?
Make another offer! Like in the „Let`s all...“ game.
„Be the change you want to see in this world“, as Mahatma Gandhi put it. A classic calendar quote, but if you take it serious and act accordingly, things around you really do change.
Actually this is, what we try to teach and learn in our workshops on various levels.
After all, the only thing we really can change is our own behaviour and attitude, not that of the others.

But now take your time to come back after summer vacation. Open one of those wine bottles that you brought with you from your trip, put up your legs, and indulge yourself in sweet vacation memories.
And then reanimate your surge for the unknown.
Possibly in one of our courses.

Barbara Klehr is a professional actress and Jazz singer. In her work as therapist she uses the tools of improv theater. Barbara teaches the Taster Weekend on September 24th+25th, the Evening Class Beginners from November 1st to December 20th, and Impro4ever "The Harold" with Leon and Norbert from September 5th to December 19th.

AUGUST

Impro and Buddhism

written by Konstanze

For quite some time I have been interested in Buddhism and its contemplative practices. Not with a religious goal to end up in Nirvana, a little bit maybe to become a better person, but mainly because it helps with almost everything. A modern term for this would be „mindfulness-training“.
The buddhist wants to reduce his suffering through mindfulness. In meditation, which aims at schooling the mindfulness, you practice to accept whatever is happening without sticking with it. Suffering, so it says, is part of resistance or the so-called „stickiness“. Meditation practices to let go, to let be.
That doesn`t mean that you shouldn`t be sad, angry or nervous at times, but you learn to let these feelings be and accept them,  and also not to identify with them, to dwell in them and thus prolong them for more than necessary. So you get to know yourself better and better. Very interesting, by the way, to look at yourself in a loving way while you have the saddest of times: not evaluating it and wanting to get rid of it right away. This can be an uncomfortable but in a way also entertaining moment...and often the misery won`t stay for very long. I am not my feelings but the one who is aware of what the feeling is.
By the way: there is an interesting research on contemplative practices by the neuropsychologist Dr. Rick Hanson in his book „Buddha's Brain" in which he relates the newest neuroscientific research to the concept of buddhism. Basically he says that through meditation you train your brain.

And where is the connection to improv?

I believe that improv is just as well a training for the brain, for your mindfulness, with many parallels to the basic axioms of buddhist practices, in a playful and joyful manner: be in the moment, say yes, listen, don`t evaluate, be in contact with yourself, your partner, your character, don`t know what will come next, don`t identify, don`t get so involved into your fantasy that you miss the next offer, don`t get so much into an emotion that you block you prefrontal cortex (the „decision maker“), otherwise there would be a lot of accidents on stage, don`t take too much time evaluating an idea or an impulse, otherwise you might miss the moment to put it into action. I am not my character, I am leading it. I conciously decide on my next action, the next move for the story.
Mindfulness is very well practiced by the steady state of split attentiveness: In order to see and hear the thousand things that happen on stage, I HAVE TO BE AWAKE. What was the offer of my partner? What does the room look like that we are in? What is my status? Should my character be happy or sad? Does the audience see me? Do I speak loud enough? What does the story need now? Didn´t I just have an impulse? And so on...
That`s what you do in meditation, but internally. Your anchor is the breathing, you always bring your attentiveness back to it and then realize: ah, a sound, ah, a thought, ah, my right toe itches, ah, dinner wants to be planned, ah yesterday-I-was-an-asshole-thought , ah there is a smell of.. I don`t know what. Conciously I let everything pass what comes up, all thoughts, feelings, sounds, smells, etc., I always return to my breath, stay in the moment.

So come on, guys, it`s summer, school is out! And even when you are not in an improv workshop right now, you can do daily pratice for your brain. Simply try to be aware of what is going on in the moment. Wherever you are. Once a day. Maybe close your eyes, sit and listen inside to what is coming.

What is thinking in me right now?
What is feeling in me right now?
Warmth, pressure, how does my jaw feel?
What do I hear?
How does my belly feel?
Can I feel my breath without changing it?
Do I drift away in thoughts?
I always return to my breath and thus return to the state of being in the moment.

Enjoy conciously licking your ice-cream, wiggling your toe in the train or the sand, breating in, breathing out.

The main thing in a sieve are the holes.

PAUSE FOR BREATH

Konstanze Kromer is a passionate improviser, she performs at Atze-Musikthetaer, is a singer and records audio books. From September 6th to October 25th she teaches the Evening Beginner Class with Lutz Albrecht.

JULY

On leading

written by Thomas

There is a nice improv-mantra, called „Follow the follower!“
There is an exercise for it that I often do in workshops: everybody walks around the space, closely watching everyone else. Then simply copy something, that you see someone else do (a little movement or the way he walks). After a while let go of it, return to „neutral“ and look for something else to copy. Never make up a movement yourself – simply copy and take everything from the others. After a while the room is filled with different movements, although no one made a distinctive offer, no one was leading, everyone just followed!
This exercise demonstrates: if you concentrate on your partner(s) and on the moment, the impulse for doing something comes all by itself.

If an actor really digs into a character he is playing, it often happens that this character „tells“ him, what he should do, how he should act and react. It's the character then, who is leading, not the actor anymore.

If you really dig into a story, being aware of the present moment and of everything which happened so far, you often will know from your intuition, what should happen next and which would be a good offer for the story. It's the story then, which is leading, not the storyteller anymore.

We often say:
„Give the story, what the story needs at this moment.“
„Give the character, what the character needs at this moment.“
„Everything that happens is meant to happen.“

And indeed it is one of the most thrilling experiences in improv, when all improvisors are surprised by what is happening, surprised by their own offers even,  but feeling that this is just right and that it's really a cool story, which they are helping to give birth to.

Who was leading then? The story? The intuition? The Universe? God?
For me, this is indeed something like the „Holy Grail“ in Improv, which unfortunately we only rarely touch, but should always aim at.

Improv can really teach us to be led by something else than our ego.
This is also an aspect of a good leader out in the business or political world: the ability to see what the market/the company/the nation/the team/the customer/the citizen really needs at this moment and to react to it (and the important part of the word „reaction“ is „action“, take a concrete step)
Then this kind of leader is like a good improvisor, who says „Yes! And...“, and not like so many leaders, who mostly say „No way!“, „Well, but...“ or „But only, if....“.

I found out that there tend to be two types of improvisors:
There are those who quickly tend to make a „strong“ offer,  making important decisions for a scene and pushing the story forward.
These types of players usually also feel more comfortable in playing high-status-characters.
Sometimes these players also have the tendency to „fight“ for their idea and even block the ideas of others. They represent the classic „leader type“ and their aim should be to pass on responsibility and to „serve the moment / the story“
On the other hand there are quite a few improvisors, especially amongst beginners, who don't like to take responsibility, usually because they are afraid of not having a good (or right) idea. They rather add more details to the status quo but prefer to let someone else take the next step in the scene or story. Not surprisingly, these players often feel more comfortable with playing low-status-characters. They never block, they always say YES, but sometimes the AND is missing. They should work on not to be afraid of making a (strong) offer.

Good improv – like good teamwork – needs both elements: advancing and expanding, giving and taking responsibility, YES and AND.

You can see this quite clearly in the „word-at-a-time-story“. Due to the rules of grammar, some words in a sentence are more important than others, those are the nouns and the verbs. I sometimes hear a sentence like this: The-big-old-round-yellow-and... Well, what, for God's sake? The noun is important in order to know who or what the story is about, so please give us a noun and not another adjective!
So next time you see such a grammatical „key word“ coming to you, take responsibility.  And at best: say something, that the story is asking for!

So, why don't you focus this month on this subject – in improv and in real life – and ask yourself the following questions:
Do I prefer to take responsibility or rather pass it on to someone else?
Do I prefer to play high status or low status?
In which situations do I prefer the one or the other?
And finally and most important:
Do I give to the story and to my partners (on stage and in life), what they need at this moment?

Have fun with this!
Thomas

Thomas guides you through the Taster Weekend on September 24th+25th and through the beginner class from October 10th to December 19th with Leon. And he (like most of our teachers) is going to be on stage with you at the Summer Open Stage on July 17th. Follow the follower…

JUNE

If you don`t have a message, leave the stage

written by Michael

When we go on stage, we are in the public, we are not part of an anonymous crowd any more, we don`t go there without a reason. We dont`t step in front of an audience for therapeutical reasons. If we have those, we can use the workshop space during training for that. No, we step out there, because we have a message, because we have a stance on something. This is what the stage and the audience expects from us!


Take the following example:
An actor is playing an anti-Fascist, who is hiding an illegal African refugee in his apartment. Now it wouldn`t be enough for the fellow improvisors to step on stage and make clear that we are all politically correct and agree with him. No, what the situation needs is an antagonist, a counterpart, who at best has a convincing charismatic character. It is our job to play this kind of character, and to play this Nazi in such a way, that he is not a dumb comedy character but a real human being. That`s where the threat really becomes threatening.


We have the tools to play such a counterpart. We have all the information, since we read the newspaper, watch the news, have discussions with friends and relatives. And we need all this information in order to have a stance on any topic.  Even speechlessness can be a message, but there has to be a reason for this speechlessness. And it only means that the character that I play is speechless or helpless, not me as the actor.


Anyone, who has nothing to say, who as a human being is speechless, has nothing to say on stage either and should leave it.

Michael Wolf works as actor, writer and director. He is founding member of Die Gorillas. Michael is going to teach the Weekend Course on October 29th+30th and the Advansters Monday Evening Class starting on October 31st. Have fun!

MAY

Mistakes can be your friends 

written by Leon

 

As we all know, improvisation has certain guidelines: be aware of your partner, accept, give and take focus, make offers, don`t ask questions, make invisible objects visible, start positive...

And then there are the rules of certain improv-games and formats: one-word-at-a-time-story, two-way-dubbing-scene, three-line-scene, four walls, count to five to start, just to name a few.
Sounds like a paradox: After all, improvisation is about dealing with the unknown and uncertain, it`s about relaxing, being in the moment and NOT thinking about and trying to fulfill any rules.
But obviously that is not the whole truth. Well, good for us Gorillas, otherwise we wouldn`t have anything to teach to you and the whole improv school wouldn`t exist.
So why are there so many rules in improv? Good question, here are three possible answers:
to distract the player from his insecurity of being on stage and not knowing what to do by focusing on the rules of an improv game (this is what Keith Johnstone did in the 60s at the Royal Court Theatre)
to find artistic freedom by using limitation of your artistic means (as done in many arts like opera and ballet)
to find out in story-telling, what a good story is about (this is in any case important)
Last but not least: to use rules in order to make a playful interaction between two or more persons easier. This is true for the stage and for real life. The so-called „soft skills“. I guess this explains the phenomenon, that a lot of people enroll in our improv-school without really aiming to be on stage sooner or later (thank you for that!)


But now to my actual subject: mistakes can be friends, have fun in failing, or: why do I announce three possible answers to my question and then give four?
By teaching improv, I have learned that, if someone gets a rule, he wants to fulfill it. And if he fails in doing so, he is dissapointed and gets angry at himself. This leads to self-destruction. Again and again I have to tell my students: „The rules are there to learn them and then to fail fulfilling them. You are here to learn and not to be able do to everything right away.“ Of course, if a student is still not able to fulfill the rules after a certain time, he has to quit the course. No, only joking, mistake.
Mistakes can be friends, because they surprise us. Because they take away the pressure from us to be perfect. Because they show us a new path, that couldn`t have been planned. And this is the essence of improvisation: Do something, of which you don`t know how it will come out in the end.
So, which mistakes can I make on the improv-stage? Here are a few popular examples:
I run through a table, that has been established by my partner.
I am not loud enough.
I forgot the name of a character.
I`m not authentic enough.
I messed up the story by making a complicated offer. Everything is possible.
But mistakes can only be friends when they don`t hit us out of the story or make us completely insecure. When they happen, you shouldn`t ignore them, because everybody has seen or heard them. Here are a few hints of how my partner could verbally react:
„I could have sworn that was a table a minute ago.“
„I know that you talk so quiet on purpose, so that I can`t understand what you`re saying.“
„Say my name or I will leave you!“
„I don`t believe what you`re saying.“
„Now could you explain to me how this whole thing can go on?“
All of these moments have the potential to bring the story into a new direction. And that is why in the best case there will be no more mistakes in the end, because all so-called mistakes can improve the story and bring more fun and energy to the scene. Or, as we like to say, everything that happens is meant to happen!
There is an exception to this new rule: when it gets too complicated, you are allowed to step out of the scene. But this shouldn`t be done as a gag, but only for means of clarification, in order to be able to still be part of the scene. After all, we should always serve the story and see what the situation needs.
To sum it up: It`s fine, if you want to learn all the improv rules and guidelines, you really should do so. YES! But once you play you shouldn´t think about them, for it`s the „mistakes“ that make you spontaneous again. So you shouldn`t get insecure when they happen, because you know that mistakes do happen and then they are no mistakes any more. And: mistakes can be friends!

Dear improv students: find the mistake in this text and send a mail to me with an explanation of why it is a mistake: leon.duevel@die-gorillas.de
All answers, also the mistaken ones, will be in the pot, from which on May31st we draw 3x1 free ticket for our show at the Grüner Salon of the Volksbühne. Winners will be notified by mail. Good luck!

Leon will teach the Monday night beginners course, starting on May 23rd.
And he will go with you to our summer-camp at the Schorfheide from July 8-10, if you like.

APRIL

Relationships

written by Regina

The heart of (improv) theatre are the stories, that we tell on stage - stories of changing relationships.
In improv theatre we not only have relationships on stage - there are also encounters among the audience and between the audience and the actors. Most relationships have been seen before, we cannot invent anything new. Yet we attempt to make the improvised relationships look fresh and alive.
How do we manage to create interesting relationships after having done improv theatre for almost 20 years (yes, next year...)?
Sure, the first encounter, flirting with someone, is electrifying, no matter what happens. An air of excitement, a fresh breeze, spring fever.
Playing in front of an audience for the first time, having a new kind of encounter with them - at the improv sessions of our improv school you can always sense that there is this special excitement.
But how can we create this flirt and these relationships on stage every time for the first time and always different? How do we develop this curiosity for each other?

In his book "Improvisation and theatre" Keith Johnstone describes how he got the impuls for creating his first improvisation exercises. He was working with actors at the Royal Court Theatre in London and he was missing exactly this kind of curiosity for each other. By making them improvise he wanted to open them up again for the moment of encounter, to get into a real and authentic relationship and to see their characters and the written text as a chance to do just that.

At the "Meta-Impro" Show during this year`s festival, Rama Nicholas from Australia made clear what really is the beginning of each relationship: the eye contact. To really look at each other, to perceive one hundred percent, and to be open for anything that evokes from this. What is my partner actually doing there? How does he look, move, what is his tone of voice?
Often there is a sudden tension between two players on stage, because of a look or an unexpected change in behaviour. And often we don`t take this moment serious and return all too quick to our comfort zone.  But holding this tension, being ready for the unknown of a relationship - this should be the first step and it should be a big one.
The just mentioned "Metaimpro" show invited the audience to witness personal monologues of the actors on stage. This created an intimate atmosphere. I could almost grab the curiosity that was suddenly in the room - as well by the fellow actors as by the audience. I felt that at this moment the actors made a big step towards us in the audience. They showed themselves and made it possible for us to really look at them closely. They took at risk, and it was not only Rama, who started the flirt with the audience.
My motto for this spring thus is: Throw yourself towards any encounter and flirt as much as possible!

Regina is starting to teach the Beginners Class on Tuesday evenings on May 25th. Her lived knowledge of relationships she and her Gorilla-husband Christoph like to share during the summer camp (August 26 to 28) to Berlin hinterland.

MARCH

Being up-to-date

written by Christoph

As in many other aspects, improv also is limitless concerning content. It is the nature of improv that we never know beforehand, what a scene will be about. I like it, when the actors  dare to be up-to-date, for in my opinion a big strength of improv is its ability to deal with current events. There is a higher level to the action on stage when I notice, that the actors are aware of what`s going on in the world, that they have informed themselves about political, social and cultural events and tendencies. When you play a heart surgeon, I don`t expect you to know all relevant medical terms. But when you are in a scene that takes place at the „Lageso“, I will be more interested in your character, when I see that you know the name of the Berlin Senator for Social matters and the name of the chairwoman of the AfD. Because I notice that you are aware of what is going on around you, and that will bring more authenticity to your character (in fact, even if you play an ignorant character, who doesn`t know these names, I can tell if the actor behind it knows them).
This year`s festival is based on these thoughts, for a main theme of the festival will be „borders and freedom“. So the major political discussion of our times will have arrived at the IMPRO, and it will be a challenge as well as an opportunity for us to deal with this and put it on stage in one way or another. And yes, it is well possible that you will see more „serious stuff“ than usual and that one or the other scene will fail to meet the demand of the topic. As a matter of fact, we even hope for this to happen. For only if we are willing to take risks, we are able to make new experiences and to develop our art form „improv theatre“ further.

Christoph is the director of the IMPROV festival, that will take place from March 11-20. This years title is „Borders. Limits. Liberty", www.improfestival.de
In the improv school he will teach an advanced-class, starting May 23, and at the end of August, together with his wife Regina, the Impro-Summer-Camp entitled „Love & Relationship“.

FEBRUARY

Being interested in your partner

written by Inbal Lori

So here’s what I have learned from watching great improvisers playing: it’s not all about them. In fact what makes their impro personal, real, flowing, funny and touching, is the amount of care and focus they give to their partners and their characters.

The audience might enjoy seeing us fighting, but I can promise you, they will care for us more if we actually like each other. The show may be amazing with this cool, extraordinary character you just found. but it will be more enjoyable and can go much further if you help us know what’s up with your partner as well.

So how much do we really see our partners when we are up there? What gifts are we giving them by asking their characters questions like: “How are you since the divorce?” or “Looking good, is that a new hair cut? “(Tim Orr, BATS)
How much focus do we give them when they have a monologue that can truly affect us and them?
Unless you're having a one woman show, impro is never all about you. be it failures or success, it’s always team work. And that means that a lot of our focus should go towards our partners and their characters, to see who they are and then understand what they need.

JANUARY

Trust

written by Urban

Welcome to 2016. Most of you probably have saluted the new year with one or another drink.
We are doing this, because we trust and hope that a new year will bring new opportunities for us and that our wishes may come true.
The new year lies ahead of us like a vast plain, covered with freh snow. Everything seems possible.

It`s the same on the Impro stage:
At first there is the empty stage, then there is a suggestion from the audience, then the first character appears on stage, the first lines of dialogue are spoken, the story develops.
Later we reflect on the scene to see which traces we left on the stage.
Just as one looks back on the snow plain, once you`ve walked through.

Improv players can only start on this journey when they have trust in each other.
When the fear of failure becomes too big, I won`t even dare to make the first step.
As an improvisor we know that a scene might become difficult. But we always trust, that a colleague will come to help move the scene forward.
And even if that doesn`t work, well, then we all fail together! Let`s shake off and get ready for another journey, on to a new scene, to undiscovered shores...

To spend lifetime in such an atmosphere of trust is something special. Whom do we really trust in our lives? Our partner? Doctors? Politicians? Our teachers? Our parents? The BIO-label on organic food? The future? Ourselves?

No matter if in real life or on the impro stage – trust can only develop when you get into contact.
„Meet somebodys eyes“ is a nice Impro-Mantra. When did we last have such a real, almost intimate contact with our partner on stage? When did we really look into his eyes? You need courage to do this. And the trust, that the other one is also looking for these real moments. How wonderful, when you are able to experience them on an impro stage!

When you play impro theater, you almost get this kind of trust as a gift. It develops by itself. Sure – there are trust-building-exercises in the workshops, such as „blind follower“. But when I am in an impro group, I have blind trust in my colleagues, because I have experienced that they accept my offers, that I am happy about their offers, that always someone jumped in when there was a critical moment on stage, that we accepted failure together and celebrated success together. We don`t work on „trust“ - we work on saying „Yes“, on being in the moment, on giving and taking responsibility, on trusting and following our impulses.
All of this leads to trust. Trust in others and trust in oneself.
We can use many of these tools in the new year.

When the glasses meet to salute the New Year, it is also important to look into each others eyes.
They say, if you don´t have eye contact, you have 7 years of bad sex.
Well, if you miss eye contact on the improv stage, you will have 7 minutes of a bad scene. At least.
Happy New Year!

2015

DECEMBER

Each offer is a gift

written by Robert

A basic rule of improvisation says that each offer of your partner is a gift. However, I have noticed that at times I find it very hard to accept certain offers. I don`t understand them. Or I do understand them, but think they are bullshit. Maybe they are just not clear or strong enough. In any case: the gift goes straight into the waste basket. What now?
I believe there is only one solution: more humility, less ego. Don`t judge, accept! Sounds simple, but it`s only possible, if you are really able to open yourself up for the moment and turn off your inner censor.
Sometimes my personal taste is in the way. I simply don`t like the offer. But it`s not about liking or disliking, it`s about trusting the path that was taken and being ready to be surprised. This enables me to really play along with my partner, whereas, if I block, we are no longer together and stand still for that moment. It might be that my partner realizes how hard it is for me to go along with his offer and then does the same in return to me, when I make an unclear or clumsy offer.

I might also think of myself as being smarter than my partner and feel the urge to correct him. But improv is not about being correct, it`s much more about embracing mistakes. Let`s see, where they lead us. Shifting the French Revolution a few decades backward or forward: pourquoi pas?

Each improviser has his own inner obstacles that hinder him to always and fully accept the offer of his partner. Even an experienced improvisor must always remember to be less smart and more in the flow of the scene, to do less judging and more developing.
If this works, chances are good that a good scene evolves, that you may discover something, that you may give and receive presents!

NOVEMBER

Depths

written by Michael

Slowly the year is coming to its end and we are decreasing speed. The trees throw off their leaves, the first snowflakes fall, the whole world seems to become more quiet. It is the time of reflection and we are leaving the surface to dive into our personal depths.
In improvised theatre I often miss these depths. An improv actor always seems to be under pressure, always on the test bench of spontaneity.
Hurry, hurry, I´ve got another idea - we stay on speed, on the passing lane, no chance to really see what`s happening around you. No chance to notice the more subtle offers, they are perished by the raging airstream of our race.
This way of playing is unfortunately positively judged by the audience: "My Goodness, they are so fast, so spontaneous!"
And shallowness has received its legitimation.
But should we be content with this? Isn`t there more? Don`t we want to tell stories, that are worth being told?
Naturally, in improv this doesn`t always work, we may fail. But whoever has received an audience feedback like "This scene or this character has really touched me or made me remember something or has made me thoughtful", will always want to go further into these depths.
A good story needs time, time for thoughts. It is these quiet moments between action and reaction, these intermissions for thoughts, that make our action on stage valuable.
Let us not sacrifice our time any more to the wasteful exchange of blows.
In this sense, I wish you courage for silence, on stage as in life.
Yours,
Michael Wolf

OCTOBER

Letting go

written by Billa

Once a wise woman told me „ Accepting things means letting them go.“ But at that time I couldn`t understand her wisdom. I thought, if something is important, I can`t just let go of it and forget about it, I need to keep it and stick to it.
Well, good thing that I write about this topic now and have to think about what it really means, expecially related towards improvisation.
I found out, that I don`t really have the power to change certain situations in life. They just happen, and if I am able to accept them, it will be easier on me and I don`t have to think and rethink about why this or that has happened to ME! I accept what happened, trusting that there is a meaning to it and that new things are about to happen, based on this event.
In this sense, letting go truly is the same as accepting. Things happen to me. I trust that there is a meaning in it, I accept the development of a scene and I let go: I let go of my idea, of how the story should have developed, I let go of my typical behaviour, I am able to jump into the new situation and might even discover new skills.
I might not like it, but improv always means interaction: with my partner, with the audience, with myself. I cannot have control. Trusting that I am able to create a mutual fantasy means letting go. Don`t stick to the thought that your beliefs are really right. In improv I often see that students want to stay in control, although the idea is that of „letting things go“. But if I let go, I have no more control, and then what?
But once I let go, I can jump into free falling, trust in everything coming together, see the attraction of the new and unknown, celebrate my curiosity – towards my partner, towards my imagination. Then I will truly be free and my imagination will soar on new grown wings.

Billa will be the teacher of the Impro4ever class "The format", beginning in January 2016.